Australian Mungbean Association

Australian-grown mungbeans have quality written all over them!

Beware of herbicide residues after dry winter

Following an exceptionally dry winter, Mr McIntosh, Pulse Australia is urging growers and their agronomists to pay particular attention to paddock selection and to avoid planting mungbeans in paddocks where there have been recent applications of residual herbicides.

 

22 October 2018

 

by Cindy Benjamin

Pulse Australia northern development agronomist Paul McIntosh is urging growers to plant mungbeans to ‘break up the sea of sorghum’ that he expects to be planted across northern NSW and southern Queensland in the 2018-19 summer.

Strong demand for Australian mungbeans is expected to keep prices buoyant and attract new and experienced growers to plant the shiny green beans. Following an exceptionally dry winter, Mr McIntosh is urging growers and their agronomists to pay particular attention to paddock selection and to avoid planting mungbeans in paddocks were there have been recent applications of residual herbicides.

“Mungbeans are very sensitive to residual herbicides, including the long-lasting Group I products such as Tordon and Lontrel, Group B sulfonylurea (SU) residues such as Glean, Logran and Ally, and Group C triazine residues such as atrazine,” he said. “Herbicide residues can pose a serious risk to mungbean crop safety, particularly after dry or cold winter conditions. Knowing the paddock history is critical and even testing for residual levels is likely to be worthwhile, given mungbean’s sensitivity.”

Other important considerations are to assess the moisture and nutrient status of the intended mungbean paddocks. Mr McIntosh said mungbeans require a minimum of 75 mm of wet soil to support a well-grown crop.

“Mungbeans are a very quick crop and it is not usually a good idea to plant knowing that success is dependent on in-crop rain. Summer planting is usually the safest planting window for most growers and generally results in the best quality product for market,” he said. “The crop will also require good supplies of phosphorus, potassium, sulfur and zinc.”

“If you plan to use grower-retained seed, test for germination % and vigour before planting and make sure seed is replaced every three years,” he said. “I’d recommend buying AMA-approved seed to be assured of strong germination and vigour, along with reduced risk of seed-borne disease. All planting seed needs to be inoculated with the correct strain of rhizobia, to ensure the crop can fix sufficient nitrogen for its own use.”

While there are limited in-crop broadleaf weed control options in mungbeans, there is compelling evidence that narrower row spacing using the same plant population can achieve a high level of crop competition, along with increased yield.

Mr McIntosh strongly recommends that growers engage the services of an agronomist who has recently updated their mungbean agronomy skills. “Over one hundred agronomists and advisors attended the AMA Mungbean Training Courses in Toowoomba, Emerald and Ayr late last year and early this year,” he said. “Having such a depth of knowledge and experience across the growing regions means growers can be confident that good advice is never far away.”

 

Other resources: Planting guide

www.mungbean.org.au